Lake County schools reopen after years of closures

RICHMOND, Va.

— A small number of students at Lee County schools will be allowed back in May.

Lee County Schools announced Tuesday they will reopen June 8 after a two-year closure due to a health crisis.

“We are grateful to the community for their support during this time,” Superintendent Michael Hoeppner said in a statement.

In January, a health scare caused many schools to close for several days, including the Lee County School in Lakewood, where a number of kids were in a medically induced coma.

The school reopened just hours later.

On Wednesday, schools will reopen with the exception of one day for an in-school art and music event.

Parents and students will also be allowed to visit their children at home on Thursday and Friday, with the intent to have them back in school as soon as possible.

At the Lee, Lakewood and Haines Schools, the closure is being done to meet federal requirements to meet state guidelines on safety and quality.

It is not clear what kind of safety measures the school will take to ensure the students’ health and well-being.

About 1,100 students were temporarily moved from the Lee-Lakewood schools to other schools in Hainesville and Rockbridge counties, but most students returned home on Friday.

The best law schools in the state

Lake County Schools — which are the most popular law school in the nation — have ranked among the top 10 law schools for students to graduate with a 4.5 GPA, according to rankings from the National Center for Education Statistics.

The rankings, released by the U.S. Census Bureau, include schools in California, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.

‘School choice’ has the same benefits as school vouchers: Princeton researchers

Princeton researchers have found that the “school choice” programs in which students can choose from schools across the country and pay a fee for their choice are more effective than vouchers, which provide vouchers at a much lower cost.

The Princeton Institute of Education and the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business published the study in the Journal of Education Finance and Policy, a journal of the Association for Education Finance.

It looked at a series of large-scale, public, public charter and public school programs in nine states, and found that these programs resulted in higher graduation rates and lower graduation costs than the programs that did not have a choice of a school.

“These results indicate that choice programs provide a better overall return on investment, and may even outperform vouchers,” the authors write.

In other words, the school choice programs have the same level of impact as vouchers.

But, they also showed that there is a downside to the programs.

“In a state with a strong public school choice program, students may be less likely to be able to afford to attend a private school,” the researchers wrote.

For example, in some states, charter schools are less likely than voucher schools to offer financial aid, such as scholarships, because the state does not require them to do so.

And, even in states where schools do offer financial assistance, students in public schools tend to take out student loans at higher rates than their peers in private schools.

This is because students who attend public schools often take on additional costs for textbooks, office supplies, and other equipment.

These costs also are more expensive to students who are less able to pay.

There is also a tradeoff: Some students may choose to attend the private school in which they were most likely to succeed.

According to the authors, this makes it more likely that the school would provide students with access to a high quality education.

Because private schools tend not to charge the students tuition, it’s less likely that students will be able access resources that might not be available at a private, public school. 

But, the authors also say, there are also many advantages to public schools over private schools, such that students attending public schools have access to better health care, a stronger economy, more flexible work schedules, and a more competitive market for jobs.

While there are some advantages to the public school system, the study says that the schools are not the only solution to the problems facing the education system.

They also point out that it’s not clear whether the choice programs would be effective at addressing the issues identified by the researchers.

A public school would need to be more diverse and more diversely funded.

Also, students would need better teachers and support systems, such the possibility of working remotely from home.

So, there is still much work to be done, the researchers write.

“We hope that this work provides a better understanding of how choice programs may work in terms of providing more choices for students and parents, which could ultimately be a more effective tool for improving outcomes in schools and in the communities where students live,” they write.