Why the ‘nail’ technology is killing the US school system

US high school students spend an average of 18 hours a day doing something that’s probably not a real nail, according to a new report.

The number of hours spent in that state-of-the-art, computer-based discipline has soared by more than 20% in the past decade.

What’s behind the dramatic rise in US school discipline?

“A lot of these kids have been pushed into a discipline system that is very different from the one they were used to in their childhood,” says Michelle Gee, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

She and her team, who published their study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also analysed school-related injuries from 2000 to 2015.

What they found is that the number of students with injuries such as cuts and bruises has doubled.

What does this mean for the future?

The authors also warn that high schoolers are increasingly being exposed to “super-charged” discipline systems that have been linked to more serious injuries and mental health problems.

In the United States, a high school student is more likely to be suspended or expelled than a high-school student in any other country.

The authors say that if these high-stakes, “supervised” schools aren’t getting more students back into a school environment, then what’s stopping them from going back to traditional classroom-based instruction?

“This is not a new problem,” says Gee.

“But it’s a very difficult problem for school systems to solve.”