‘School is not a safe place’ for transgender students in Maryland

LEEDS, Md.

— A transgender student in Maryland says he has experienced discrimination at the school where he attends, even though his name matches that of the girl who identifies as female.

Liz Anne McArthur says she was initially shocked when she was told she couldn’t use the girls bathroom at Leedson Middle School.

She said she was given a letter from the principal, and a “slimy, sexist, homophobic” email was sent to the school.

The letter from Principal Richard Meehan read, “I am appalled by your choice to be a girl.

Your presence at school is not safe.”

McArthur says the principal told her that she could not use the boys restroom.

McArthur is transgender, but says she prefers to be called Liz, because her birth name matches the name of the first person she was born with.

She says the letter was the first time she had been targeted for her gender identity, and that she was afraid to report it to the principal.

She was able to report the harassment to the superintendent’s office, and then to the district attorney, and finally to the governor’s office.

McKayla McArthur said that she and her mother, who is also transgender, were told that the harassment was the result of bullying, and was directed at their son.

She has been to the attorney general’s office for help, and she has filed a civil rights complaint.

The school has been placed on a five-year, $1.5 million bond, and the principal is now under investigation.

The Montgomery County Board of Education announced Monday that it had reached an agreement with the school district to help pay for a $1 million grant to help with the district’s transition efforts.

The agreement, which was reached in March, calls for the district to contribute $1,000 a year to a transgender student’s transition fund and to continue to pay the teacher who taught the transgender student.

In addition, the district will pay $500 a month for counseling and support services for the transgender and gender nonconforming students.

McAdams said that school has received $5,000 in grants to pay for the transition services, and said that the money will go to the teacher and his office.

She said the district has also committed to donating $1 of the money to the National Center for Transgender Equality.

“I’m going to keep fighting for it,” McAdams said.

“When I’m in a classroom, and I’m not able to access the locker room, the bathroom, the rest of the world doesn’t see me,” she said.