The new US college degree – and how to earn it, even if you can’t afford to buy one

A new report from the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) suggests that graduates who are unemployed are able to earn the equivalent of a vocational school degree even if they are unemployed and can’t get on with their lives.

CGS deputy chief economist, Andrew Cole, said the report shows that graduates with vocational qualifications who are not able to find work are able, even when they are in the job market, to earn up to £100,000 more than graduates who had completed a similar degree.

In a separate report, the CGS said the number of unemployed graduates had increased from 17.6 million in 2014 to 20.2 million in 2016. “

This is not necessarily because they have completed more work but because of their qualifications.”

In a separate report, the CGS said the number of unemployed graduates had increased from 17.6 million in 2014 to 20.2 million in 2016.

It said that while it is important to keep in mind that a vocational degree is not the same as a job, those who cannot find work will still benefit from vocational training.

But Mr Cole said it was “not clear” if graduates with the right qualifications would be able to keep on working after graduating from a vocational course.

Mr Johnson, the Labour leader, said: “It is time for the Government to recognise that not everyone with a degree in the vocational training sector is able to make the transition from one job to another. “

[But] many others are likely to return to work with a vocational education.”

Mr Johnson, the Labour leader, said: “It is time for the Government to recognise that not everyone with a degree in the vocational training sector is able to make the transition from one job to another.

People should be allowed to make that transition.

They should not be put off and discouraged.”

“The Government needs to stop thinking about vocational training in the same way that it thinks about a job.”

The CGS says it would like to see vocational education recognised as a qualification in the Employment Act, so that graduates would not be forced to go back to work even if their degree was not recognised.

And it wants to see the Government create a “vocational apprenticeship” scheme to provide apprentices with the opportunity to work in the public sector.

The report was published on Monday.

Its findings come after the CPG warned that graduates could lose up to two years of employment if the Government does not act to improve the vocational system.

Its chairman, Mark Bostock, said that in 2016, graduates with a Bachelor of Education and Science degree would have a lifetime earnings of more than £50,000, while those with a Bachelors of Education degree would be worth more than twice as much.

There were about 8 million people aged 15 to 64 who had an undergraduate degree, or higher, in 2016-17, according to the latest Census figures, the first annual survey of the population aged 15-64.

More:Read the full report from CGS here